Pine View Wildlife Rehabilitation Center - New Patients
W4953 Hwy H, Fredonia, WI 53021
(262) 692-9021
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class_with_Jeannie Painted Turtle two great horned owls
New Patients - Follow Their Journeys

Summer 2018 

We have our first six hatchlings of the year! It is easy to forget that spring is not the only baby season of the year for wildlife, especially when this round brings such tiny (but just as adorable) creatures into the world.
hatchlings hatchlings


Update on the Merlin: Our rescued Merlin was ready to go, and it let us know it! She flew beautifully and noisely over the field and headed toward the tallest tree on the tree line. She even called out a few times after perching somewhere in the trees making it very clear that this is where she belongs.
merlin release merlin release merlin release


Multiple turtles hit by cars cannot be rehabilitated due to the extreme extent of their injuries. These photos capture the pain and destruction when a turtle was attacked by a dog.
Turtle attacked by dog turtle attacked by dog

This is a photo of a turtle that will be a long-term patient at our hospital. The individuals who found this painted turtle after it had been hit by a car felt they could care for it and used Quickie Glue on the severly fractured shell! Why??? This caused permanent damage to the scutes (top of the shell) and makes healing of the broken pieces impossible. Veterinary consultation and x-rays indicate that in time, new tissue will form beneath the damaged shell.
turtle with damaged shell

Recently five fox were released back into the wild after being with us for several months. All of them were admitted as orphans in early spring and now have the skills necessary to survive in the wild.
fox release fox release
fox release fox release
fox release fox release


This immature Merlin was admitted from Sheboygan after colliding with a patio window while trying to escape harrassment by other birds.
merlin


An orphaned immature Coopers Hawk was admitted this week from a fellow rehabilitation center.
coopers hawk


Back home at last! Jim, one of our Board of Director members and a volunteer, released a turtle that we overwintered last year.
turtle release turtle release  
turtle release


Spring 2018


And then there were three! So far, this season has brought us three Great Horned Owlets and three Red Fox kits that will be long-term patients. It is crucial to house these creatures with others of the same species at this young age so they will imprint on their own species and learn approriate social behaviors.
3 owls 3 fox


This immature, female Red Fox was admitted today after being found next to its deceased parent. Major effort was put into finding possible siblings but none were found in the nearby den. Thank you to all involved in the rescue and transportation of this small creature.
Fox Pup Fox Pup


This little Screech Owl recently flew into a car. Not knowing what hit them, the family turned the car around and found him laying in the middle of the road. Despite the terrible weather conditions, they brought it to us for help. We've given it pain medication and it's resting comfortably in a warm and quiet enclosure. We owe the family many thanks for saving this little owl.
Screech Owl


Recently we admitted our third Great Horned Owl. This young owl was in the process of starting to make its way out of the nest and onto the next step of perching on branches when it fell from the tree. Due to its vulnerability to predators and the poor weather conditions, intervention was deemed necessary.
GHO GHO


Weighing in at just 320 grams, this 4-5 week old fox pup rings in the start of the baby season after being admitted a few days after our first immature Great Horned Owl (below).
fox pup fox pup


The first of the spring babies have arrived! This seven-week old Great Horned Owl was admitted to Pine View on April 7. Two women had been watching the nest and called us when the young owl was inside the base of a rotting tree. We will be going to the vet to determine the extent of the wing injury and the vision difficulties. The second bird is an adult Great Horned Owl who was rescued by a driver when she noticed the owl sitting in the middle of the freeway outside of Oostburg. We will be asking the vet to determine the wing injuries. Thanks to the folks who helped with these rescues!
gho  gho 



Winter 2017/2018

At dusk on February 16, Kristen Ternes rescured a Bald Eagle near Lake Michigan in Ozaukee County. Upon admit, the bird's body was contorted, head slung backwards, wings extended, and an obvious lack of vision. Two days later, thanks to the super team of Kelli and Gary Durians, the bird was able to stand, has retained eyesight, and is improving... for now. Further evaluation and assessment to include blood work and a fecal test will be necessary. Any donations to benefit this patient are greatly appreciated, including fish.
injured eagle injured eagle
Update! The Bald Eagle admitted last Friday is now eating on his own and has gained quite the appetite. Blood was drawn today to test for lead poisoning along with a variety of blood values. There has been a marked improvement in the birds demeanor and hopefully the tests will yield results that coincide with our anecdotal observations.
Eagle update
Final Update! After six weeks of rehabilitation, the eagle has been successfully released back to the wild. Read about the entire journey and team efforts involved in this special event in the Pine View Release Spring Newsletter.
Eagle Release



In the past two weeks, Pine View has had a higher number of admits than normal for this time of year. A Rough-Legged Hawk was rescued by Kristen in the town of Belgium after dusk. A concerned citizen called after spotting this gorgeous bird struggling along the side of the road. Early indicators suggest vehicular trauma. X-rays show a greenstick fracture in the radius which we are optimistic will heal with immobilization of the wing and rest.
rough legged hawk injured wing

An ornate box turtle was admitted on 1/20 and is very enthused about his food. For the staff, it was a joyous moment as when this Wisconsin endangered species was admitted, he was extremely dehydrated, emaciated, and x-rays revealed advancing metabolic bone disease. With intense triage, observation, medication, and appropriate habitat, the turtle is recovering slowly.
turtle eating box turtle

On 1/29/18 this red-tailed hawk was admitted from the Mequon area after what seems to have been a collision with a wind turbine. Fortunately x-rays showed no fractures but this unfortunately meant we could not guesstimate the rate of recovery, if there was to be one at all. As you can see from the pictures below she went from being lethargic and weak to the prideful bird we all know red tails to be within one weeks time and continues to make improvements!
red tailed hawk Red tailed hawk

This Great-Horned owl was found on the side of the road in the Boltonville area on 1/28/18 after possibly being hit by a car. He unfortunately succumbed to his compromised state of emaciation combined with stress and died a few days after being admitted. 
GHO 

On December 18, a Great Horned Owl was admitted after he was found on the side of the road in Waldo. He was admitted with severe bruising on both wings, but luckily he had no fractures. After a month of rest and flight therapy, he was released back to the same area where he was found.
GHO GHO release GHO Release

This young, first-year Red-Tailed Hawk was admitted to Pine View the day before Thanksgiving after being hit by a car in Cedar Grove. She was extremely lucky not to have any fractures or major injuries and was released in early to mid December.
Red tailed hawk Red tailed hawk
red tailed hawk red tailed hawk

Unfortunately, not all of our stories have happy endings, especially at this time of year. This little Screech Owl was admitted on December 4 from Newburg with injures typical of being hit by a car. The vet discovered that she was cortically blind in one eye due to head trauma, and her other eye was also not functioning. Knowing that she could not survive with blindness in the wild, it was determined that she should be euthanized.
screech screech

Our mantra at Pine View is "There is no such thing as a pet wild animal".


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